Jonathan Aarons M.D.

Tired of Chronic Pain?

Trigger finger

 

Trigger finger
Trigger finger

Trigger finger is a painful syndrome caused by inflammation and swelling of the tendons on the palm side of the finger.  The tendons connect muscle to bone.  The muscles that move the fingers are located in the forearm.  The tendons extend from the muscles of the forearm, past the wrist, and then attach to the fingers.  Inflammation and swelling of the tendons can occur after trauma or by repetitive motion against the bones of the hand.  Nodules can also develop on the tendons at the point of irritation and can be felt as the fingers move.  The pain of a trigger finger is worsened with motion of the hand and with gripping of the fingers.  There may be a creaking sensation as the fingers move and the range of motion of the fingers may be limited.  Trigger fingers usually develop between the ages of 40 and 60 years.  Females are affected more frequently than males.  Coexisting conditions such as gout and arthritis may predispose to this condition.  Plain X-rays may be useful to exclude other causes of pain.  Blood work may detect other conditions such as gout that may aggravate the condition.  Treatment includes rest and splinting.  Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications may help alleviate the pain.  Injection of the trigger finger with a solution of a local anesthetic and a steroid may be helpful.  Finally, in patients with persistent pain, surgical intervention may be necessary.

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